CORONAVIRUS update from The Trustees. Learn More

Trustees
on the Coast

Footage: Above Summit

Protect, Engage, Connect

In 1891, our founder Charlies Eliot recognized the importance of the coastline for future generations, and acted to protect it from the major threat of its day—rapid development, and privatization. One of the first acts of The Trustees was to commission the Province Lands Report, a natural history survey and management recommendations for the outer Cape. That report laid the foundation for what was to become the National Seashore.

Today only the federal and state government have more of the Commonwealth’s coastline in their care. We are proud to protect and steward 120 miles of shore in 25 of the state’s 78 coastal communities, including 26 miles of beaches and dunes, islands, 2,300 acres of salt marsh, and miles of rocky coasts and islands—all landscapes of extraordinary ecological value, and some of our most dynamic. Each year, a half million people visit The Trustees coastal places to unwind and relax, to seek calm and experience wonder. We invite you to explore these special, ever-changing reservations, and experience the coast in new and active ways!

Our Coastal Work
Find Us On the Coast!

Sun, Sand & Surf

Whether you intend to take a refreshing plunge, play in the sand, or just soak up the sun, discover one of our unparalleled seaside experiences for a beautiful day at the beach!

Get Active!

Consider a coastal landscape for your next adventure, and enjoy a hike along a coastal bluff, an afternoon of fishing in a cove, or a morning of birdwatching across the marsh.

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