CORONAVIRUS update from The Trustees. Learn More

Caring for and Restoring Habitats

Geology, climate, natural forces, and human activity have converged to support a variety of ecological communities familiar to all of us: barrier beaches, spruce-fir forests, broad floodplains, and grasslands.

Geology, climate, natural forces, and human activity have converged to support a variety of natural habitats familiar to all of us: barrier beaches, sugar maple-beech forests, broad floodplains, and grasslands.

Many of these habitats face a variety of threats. Across the state, invasive non-native species, such as oriental bittersweet, can change the character of these habitats and drive out native species. Increased storms resulting from a changing climate are causing excessive erosion across slopes. And the suppression of natural forest disturbances results in the loss of early successional plant communities. The Trustees are working to combat these threats in a number of ways, including:

managing non-native plants and animals

clustering conservation lands to combat fragmentation of natural areas

protecting uninterrupted expanses of certain landscape types on which threatened species depend

optimizing our farms to support people and nature

maintaining grasslands as important habitat for certain species

Habitat Restoration

On a limited basis, The Trustees work to restore significant natural habitats at reservations seriously threatened by some of the above-mentioned situations. In these cases, we endeavor to restore habitats and species along with the natural and cultural processes that created and maintain the habitat. Examples include tide marsh, barrens, and floodplain forest restoration.

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