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Northeast

Gerry Island

Marblehead

1.5 acres

Experience this beloved and iconic feature of Marblehead’s coastal landscape, situated in scenic Little Harbor.

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Plan Your Visit
  • Overview
  • Ideas for Your Visit
  • Admission & Hours
  • Directions
  • Property Map
  • Regulations & Advisories

Overview

Located at the end of a naturally occurring gravel land-bridge that’s exposed at low tide, Gerry Island is a neighbor to The Trustees’ Crowninshield Island. Together, these lands make up a modest portion of the Marblehead’s open space and afford stunning views of quintessential New England rocky coastline.

 

Ideas for Your Visit

Experience this special place—visible from historic Fort Sewall and Marblehead’s Gas House Beach—on foot by walking across a rocky tombolo (or spit of land), which is accessible only around low tide. Journey by watercraft and duck into picturesque coves on either side of the island, explore the intertidal zone, and enjoy unique views of the historic Marblehead shoreline.

Admission & Hours

This property is open during normal hours. The Trustees asks that visitors follow social distancing guidelines for the health and safety of all. Please note: all buildings and inside areas are remain closed on all properties. For more information about our response to COVID-19, please click here.

When to Visit
Open year-round, daily, sunrise to sunset. Allow a minimum of 1/2 hour.

Fees
FREE to all.

Directions

Gashouse Lane
Marblehead, MA 01945
Telephone: 978.526.8687

Get directions on Google Maps.

There is no dedicated parking, and that visitors are advised to seek legal street parking in the neighborhood.

Visitors are advised that the island can typically only be accessed within about 90 minutes of low tide. Be sure to check local tide listings before you head out to avoid getting stranded on the island by the incoming tide.

Access at low tide via causeway. Boat/kayak/SUP required during high tide. For your safety, we advise visitors to wear footwear suitable for walking across an uneven and slippery rocky shore. Unfortunately, due to the terrain and the slope leading up to the island, Gerry Island is not wheelchair accessible.

Property Map

We have no trail map available at this time.

Regulations & Advisories

  • Although work to eradicate poison ivy on the island continues, it does persist in some areas. Visitors are advised to tread carefully and/or wear closed toed shoes when visiting the island.
  • If accessing the island by foot, for maximum time, plan to arrive one hour before dead low tide and leave by one hour after.
  • Dogs must be leashed at all times.
  • Always check for ticks: on yourself, your family members, and pets. Water craft: Landing only
  • The possession of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.
  • Carry in – Carry out trash policy.
  • The Trustees reserves the right to photograph or video visitors and program participants for promotional use, and usage of our properties implies consent. Please read our photo and video policy.
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History

Referenced in early records as Maverick’s Island, Gerry Island was owned in the mid- 18th century by Thomas Gerry, whose son Elbridge Gerry rose to prominence as a signer to the Declaration of Independence, Governor of the Commonwealth, and Vice President to President James Madison. He was also a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, where he helped draft the Bill of Rights. While often best known as the inspiration for the term “gerrymandering” after he signed into law a redistricting bill that favored his party, Gerry’s contributions to our nation’s history were far more significant and profound.

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