Sunday, June 20, 2021

Summer Solstice at World’s End

solstice

About Summer Solstice at World’s End

This event has sold out.

Join us for the best summer celebration on the South Shore!

Pack a picnic and invite your friends and family to join us in celebrating this remarkable property on the longest day of the year.

Experience the unique thrill of driving out on the carriage roads, designed by Frederik Law Olmstead in 1890, to set up your picnic on the top of Planter’s Hill. Dance to the music of the Aldous Collins Band, enjoy a snack from Fenway’s own “Sausage Guy” and Nona’s ice cream, and relax as the sun sets over the Boston skyline.

Cost of admission is $40 per vehicle, $32 per vehicle for Trustees members. Pre-registration is required.

More information:

Your ticket covers field parking for one vehicle and admission for up to five people. World’s End gates open at 5PM and all vehicles must leave the property by 9PM.

Accessibility: Parking and picnic areas are in fields on Planter’s Hill. Accessible parking close to the picnic area and other accommodations are available. Please reach out to Anne Smith-White (asmithwhite@thetrustees.org) for more information.

Bring your own picnic or purchase food from “The Sausage Guy.” World’s End has a carry in/carry out policy. Please arrange to bring your trash home to compost and recycle!

In the event of severe weather, Summer Solstice will be cancelled and tickets refunded. An email will be sent to the address used for the ticket purchase, and the cancellation posted to the World’s End Facebook and Instagram pages.

Per State guidelines, non-vaccinated individuals are advised to continue wearing face masks and to continue distancing.

Portable toilets available on site.

World’s End was once one of Massachusetts’ most threatened coastal landscapes. In 1890, plans were drawn up for a 163-house residential subdivision. In 1945, the property was short-listed for the site of the United Nations headquarters, which ultimately found its home in New York City. Twenty years later, it was eyed as a possible site for a nuclear power plant. But in 1967, thanks to local commitment and tremendous fundraising efforts, dedicated residents from Hingham and surrounding communities partnered with The Trustees to preserve this special place.

Explore Events Like This